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Res College Symposium 2018 has ended
The symposium is an  inter-college event where students openly discuss the topics explored  within each college’s respective theme.

Every  RC  student will give either a Presentation or a  Poster -  either as a  group  or as an individual project.  Every RC student will also be an audience  member.  

At Registration, you will receive a name tag with your schedule on it.

The Symposium is organized into two, concurrent, sessions: Session I: 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. & Session II: 3:10 p.m. - 4:40 p.m.

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Humanities [clear filter]
Saturday, December 1
 

1:40pm

Albet Camus V. Jean-Paul Sartre
Being two of the most  fundamental pioneers of Existentialism, French Philosophers Albert Camus and  Jean-Paul Sartre had their different approach to the idea of "what is  human"

Speakers
TJ

Tang, Jiaqi

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Confederate Carving on Stone Mountain
The Confederate  Carving on Stone Mountain is the largest confederate memorial in the country.  There is rising debate and controversy for the future of this monument. Will  it be removed or remain standing?

Speakers
BJ

Barbera, Jesse

Humanities College
BT

Baldwin, Thomas

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Consciousness
My project will be  about the human consciousness, what it is, if it is necessary, and how it  relates to what it means to be a human.

Speakers
LE

Lagerback, Elizabeth

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Consciousness and the Imagination
Exploring the functions of human consciousness and imagination. The ability to conceptualize, dream, and create are key to human existence. 

Speakers
HS

Horn, Scarlett

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Death Rituals In Cultures Around the Globe
Nearly every culture  on earth has their own customary rituals that they perform when someone  within their culture dies. Although nearly every culture has customary  rituals based around death, this does not mean that they are in anyway the  same as many cultures hold different and often times peculiar after death  rituals. This project explores a few cultures different customary rituals  that they formed around death.

Speakers
LC

Littenberg, Chase

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Death Through Music
Humans desire  knowledge and death provides us with the ultimate question. What happens?  Where do we go? Music is a way in which these questions are often evaluated.  To learn more about death music can provide insight into experiences we have  not yet had and ease our fear of the unknown.

Speakers
DA

Doane, Andrew

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Exploring the Concreteness of Human Experience Through Classical Music
How does music make  us human? How does meaning arise from nothing but sounds without lyrics? How  does this given "meaning" shape the concreteness of the human  experience? Using these questions, I explore the the essence of music apart  from it's existence and creation by composers. In exploring this existential  theme of absent inherent meaning, one can come to understand music as a  language and an essence that facilitates human connection, emotion, and  imagination.

Speakers
CI

Carrega, Isabella

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Life's Meaning and the Absurd: Reasoning and Alternatives
Life's Meaning and the Absurd: Reasoning and Alternatives focuses on Albert Camus's theory of the absurd, and specifically his concept of philosophical suicide, which refers to people establishing meaning beyond themselves, denying the indifference of the universe, and overall rejecting the absurd. Our presentation draws on the ways in which many people commit philosophical suicide, either through believing in God or assigning meaning to the universe. Along with the reasons why people choose to commit philosophical suicide, which may range from fear of failure, lack of stability, and society's influence on the fulfillment of voids. 

Speakers
BM

Brown, Maya

Humanities College
HV

Hendricks, Verona

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

Relations between Homegoing and 12 Years A Slave
Comparing the novel Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi, and the motion picture 12 Years A Slave. The difference of reading about slavery in Homegoing and viewing slavery in 12 Years a Slave. 

Speakers
DW

Donovan, William

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

1:40pm

Slavery and discrimination
To explore the relationship between slavery and discrimination. Besides this, I want to introduce some important things or people related to slavery and discrimination.

Speakers
WH

Wang, Hanzheng

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

The Problem of Evil
My project focuses on  the problem of evil and the concept of nature vs. nurture. A test was run on  sets of twins and the study has shown that psychopathy is 60 percent  heritable. This suggests that psychopathic traits are largely genetically  determined. There has also been a correlation between criminal psychopathy  and brain abnormality. As this brain abnormality in the majority of cases of  psychopathic criminals is not abruptly acquired, there is good reason to  think that it's grounded in the psychopath's DNA. In addition one common  explanation is that psychopaths experience some kind of trauma in early  childhood.
  

Speakers
DA

Diaz, Angelique

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

the problems of evil
why people think  people are more evil than other people and what makes a person more evil

Speakers
LB

Lundy, Brenden

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

1:40pm

The Public Presence of Confederate Monuments
The debate concerning  Confederate monuments has become increasingly more divisive and hostile in  recent years, reaching the point of the Charlottesville Riots in 2017. It's  important to analyze the effect and emotional impact these monuments have for  both opposing sides in order to determine how best to peacefully move forward  as a more unified country.

Speakers
LA

Lopez, Anthony

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

1:40pm

The Value of Absurdity to Humanity
The purpose and goal of my oral presentation is to bring into question the actual value and practicality of implementing the philosophy of absurdity into one's life. I accomplished this by examining the absurd heroes we have studied in class and comparing the pros and cons of living the way they did. Through my cross-examination of these absurd heroes I am able to come to the conclusion that the giving into the absurd prevents one from experiencing emotions that are essential to what it means to be a human being.       

Speakers
MD

MacKelcan, Davis

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 1:40pm - 3:00pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Alien and the Odyssey
The Odyssey is a timeless classic, rich with a diverse gallery of monsters. Ridley Scott's Alien (1979), dubbed one of many classic movies, involves it's own monster with notable similarities to those in the Odyssey. I will be discussing these similarities, as well as their importance to story telling both ancient and modern.

Speakers
YM

Yoo, Marissa

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Alienation In The Stranger
Existentialism is a  philosophy in which the universe is seen as being devoid of meaning except  that which humans give it through the use of their free will. Alienation, in  existentialist philosophy, is the detachment of a subject from an object,  activity or setting to which it innately belongs in the natural world. It is  inherently connected to existentialism but did not arise from the philosophy  itself. There are three types of alienation, that of self, nature and others.  These ideas stem from humans desire to establish an identity; however,  because of the ever changing nature of identity, humans become isolated from  themselves, their work and other people.

Speakers
PD

Piazza, Dominic

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

An Absurd Play For An Absurd Audience
Absurdity.  Existentialism. Humanity. These themes exemplify and are personified through  our protagonists, Advantage and Margerie, an ordindary couple who decided to  embrace Camus' "Theory of the Absurd".

Speakers
CP

Cholnoky, Peter

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Ancient Flood Stories of Different Cultures
"Why is there so much water everywhere?", ancient people, probably.  Throughout ancient history and in antiquity, people of diverse cultures in different areas of the globe have shared stories of floods impacting their lives.  Are there similarities between the the stories?  Why do the people tell such stories?  I have analyzed stories from different regions in different eras in history and conveyed my interpretations.

Speakers
TA

Thomas, Andrew

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Ancient Greek sports
I will choose a few  sports I find fascinating and y’all about the rules and objective of the  game

Speakers
AC

Andrews, Carnell

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Armor: Survival and Symbolism
In the Iliad warriors' armor is described in detail with a great deal of emphasis placed upon it.  This symbolic importance of armor stems from the historical importance of armor in Ancient Greek society.  In this presentation we will compare and contrast the mythical armor from the Iliad with the armor that archaeologists have found from Ancient Greece. 

Speakers
SC

Simon, Charlotte

Humanities College
ME

Morris, Emily

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Authenticity
Through an existentialist viewpoint, authenticity is the scope to which an individual's actions coincide with their values, thoughts, and emotions after they eliminate outside forces, ranging from familial pressure to finances (Raymond 1991, 16-17). It is also said that authenticity is built through creativity, originality, and on multiple occasions, the rejection of the rules of society (Taylor 1992, 66). Thus, by this notion, an authentic person is unconcerned with the opinions of others and instead focuses on being true to him or herself. This is a difficult feat and as a result, most individuals identify inauthenticity in themselves and others.

Speakers
MM

Majewski, Marta

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Constantine the Great and the Orthodox Church
Constantine the Great is one of the most influential figures in the Orthodox Church. In this project, I will present to you a brief biography of Constantine and ways in which he helped shaped the Orthodox Church that we know today. 

Speakers
ND

Niaros, Dimitrios

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

3:10pm

David, King of Israel
We will be discussing God's influence on King David as well as how his heritage influenced his decisions as King.  

Speakers
GL

Grover, Luke

Humanities College
BM

Bennett, Madeline

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

3:10pm

Gone With The Wind: A Confederate Monument
Because Gone With The Wind manipulates the visual portrayal of characters' experiences to evoke empathy for the South during the Civil War, the film focuses less on historical accuracy and more on the loss of southern heritage, making it a Confederate monument.


https://create.piktochart.com/output/34567495-gone-with-the-wind-a-confederate-monument

Speakers
PJ

Parrino, Jessica

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Screen

3:10pm

Greco-Persian Wars
This poster will look  at the significance of the Greco-Persian Wars, and how it effected both  parties in the war. Will be discussing major events and how it contributed to  the final outcome

Speakers
KA

Kshettry, Adit

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Electricity, Table

3:10pm

Investigating the Stories Behind Monticello and Smith Plantations
Many questions have been asked about the history and stories behind Monticello. There have been many things found about the home, slaves, and about Thomas Jefferson that have revealed a story behind Monticello. A smaller plantation called the Smith Plantation has not undergone any investigation about the stories of its past and what that means about the family. What would occur if these questions were asked? What kind of story would be discovered? 

Speakers
MM

Mishler, Molly

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Stoicism: Zeno, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius
My project will be about Stoicism and the three principal leaders of this philosophy: Zeno, Serena, and Marcus Aurelius. Stoicism has just a few central teachings. It reminds us how brief our life is. How unpredictable the world can be. How small we are in the grand scheme of things. And so, it sets out to teach us how to be steadfast, strong, and in control of yourself. How to accept that there are things we can't control and utilize to the fullest of what we can control: our mind and our action. 

Speakers
BM

Bui, Minh

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

3:10pm

TBD
tbd


Speakers
KJ

Kohler, Joshua

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

The Dionysian Mysteries
The Dionysian Mysteries were a religious cult of ancient Greece and Rome known for their use of alcohol and trance-inducing ritual practices as a means of self-liberation and transcendence.  Through religious rites, one could overcome societal constraints and mental limitations to gain access to the innate and uninhibited "true self"- personified by Dionysus.  Through closer examination of these rituals, we can gain insight into the ancient Greek and Roman psyche- one afflicted by tensions between the civilized and uncivilized self.

Speakers
LS

Lamade, Sage

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

The Last Roman
An examination into  the life of Belisarius, a Byzantine general from the 6th century. A  remarkably skilled tactician, he succeeded despite Justinian's jealousy,  which often translated to a lack of support from the emperor.

Speakers
KP

Kendall, Peyton

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

The Lost Tomb of Alexander the Great
This poster will focus on the millennia old question of the location of the final resting place of Alexander the Great. It will outline the known travels of his body up until the rise of Christianity, and offer plausible theories to where it resides now. Finally it will explain why the finding of the body would be a monumental event that effects global society. 

Speakers
KJ

Kennedy, Jacob

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC
  • Special Requirements: Table

3:10pm

The Peloponnesian War
431 BCE, Ancient  Greece. The Thirty Years' Peace brought prosperity to the the city of Athens  and their Delian League, essentially becoming an empire. Threatened by this, the hardened city of Sparta and their Peloponnesian League took action,  resulting in the drastic end of the glory days of Ancient Greece.

Speakers
avatar for Venico, Renne Emmanuel

Venico, Renne Emmanuel

Humanities College
HS

Haber, Sarah

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Trepanation
Trepanning, also  known as Trepanation, is an old, ancient surgical intervention that consists  of an individual drilling a hole or scraping into the human skull.  Individuals that behaved in an abnormal manner often suffered from this  procedure in an effort to let out evil spirits that many believed were  dwelling within them. This practice was believed to have been useful in  treating health problems related to diseases or injury related to the brain,  such as epileptic seizures, migraines, and mental disorders..

Speakers
LA

Lai, Angela

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC

3:10pm

Women's Mental Health: From Hysteria to Housewives
A survey of the  history of women's mental health, starting with Ancient Greek medicine and  carrying through to Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique

Speakers
MR

Milio, Rachel

Humanities College


Saturday December 1, 2018 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Terrace Toom ELC